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Poster: staggerleib Date: Oct 2, 2007 2:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Workingman's Dead DVD

OH MY GOD! This mix is so amazing. How many times have I listened to this album? It was released in 1970, and in the intervening 37 years, I've never heard all of what was on the mix. The harmonies, and incidental parts that come out in the DVD mix are, for lack of a better word, revelatory.

Listen to this through headphones. You won't believe your ears.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Oct 2, 2007 2:49pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD

I listened to it on ecstasy once, I bet I know EXACTLY what you're talking about. All the sonic landscape on Uncle Johns alone is astounding

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 2, 2007 3:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD

Hey--are you refering to the DVD released by Rhino in 2001? Tell us more, please...what are the interviews--is this a collection of audio and video clips as well? I am an idiot...please explain more.

Thanks.

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Oct 2, 2007 3:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

"I am an idiot . . .please explain more"

I know how you feel

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 2, 2007 3:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

On this most auspicious of days I would like to thank Britney for convincing me that anything can happen and of course, I must thank...

Crap, what kind of award comes with this anyhow? Do I really need a full blown acceptance speech? Can you just send me the goods and let me get on with celebrating?

Are you the awards ceremony master? What do I get for this anyway? Squat, as usual I suppose? Damn...getting my hopes up...

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Oct 2, 2007 3:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Well Tell, I feel confident in at least saying that considering that this is a Grateful Dead forum you will be afforded as long as speech as you like. None of this playing crappy theme music as soon as you accept your award to let you know it's time to get you butt offstage. So hell you can do like a 45 minute acceptance speech weaving in and out of several other tangents if you like. You might even want to take a set break breaking your speech up into two parts.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 2, 2007 4:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Damn right! I want addt'l time to tune, and considerable time for a story about my dog...and even dogs that I don't own but might have seen, since Bob did that more than once.

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I will get back to you when I have fleshed out at least 90 min of air time.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Oct 2, 2007 4:20pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

I'll have my mics set up and ready!

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Oct 2, 2007 4:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

You get the honor of selecting a show for tomorrow's listening pleasure.

Please feel free to submit as long a speech as you want and embellish it with a fine sound track.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 2, 2007 5:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Well, in that case, no speech is necessary, for this says it all:

http://www.archive.org/details/gd68-12-29.sbd.cotsman.5425.sbeok.shnf

Enjoy, again!

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Oct 2, 2007 5:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Dogs? Welch Corgis? Arent they like German Shepherds without legs? Please tell us the stories and put up some funny pictures too. Oh, and congrats on the award. It's quite a long drop from Prime Minister to whatever they call this, but it's always good to make an impression.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 2, 2007 6:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

OMG! Your memory serves you too well my friend! Yes, the dogs that are "like big dogs that got put in the dryer!"

Love them to death. I have two, Jock and Wyatt. And you couldn't find any more lovable beasts.



Attachment: Couch pot 2.jpg
Attachment: tired Wyatt.jpg

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Oct 3, 2007 9:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Excellent call William - I'm up to the Cryptical - very impressive show that I will have to put on disc!!!!

I'm glad you won quote of the day!!!

:)

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 3, 2007 2:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Watch out! HF may be reading this! He hates reviews that do that ("I am up to...and it is awesome!"). JK, High!

Glad you like it; MP3 files at forum are better--"fixed"--over the WAVs I have accumulated (I have three versions of the damn thing now I think)...many early shows have vicious cuts...crap.

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Poster: high flow Date: Oct 3, 2007 2:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Quote of the Day - goes to William Tell

Hey Man! I Specifically used the word dislike....not hate.

....and yes, I am watching. Always.

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Oct 3, 2007 4:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD

Yes, Rhino released it in 5.1 from the original masters that Mickey reworked. The harmonies are incredible. There was another one released on American Beauty, given the same treatment.

There's only a couple of interviews with Bobby, and they talk about Pigger, mostly.

I wish that I could link, or even rip it, but alas, that's beyond me technically. Anyone wanna offer advice?

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Oct 3, 2007 11:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD Liner Notes

BillTell-
HEARING THE FIRST CHORDS... of "Uncle John's Band" on a car radio in American in 1970 was like being at a flamboyant and increasingly ominous party and then discovering a secret door leading out and away. Once you stepped through it, there was a group of mellow hipsters back there passing the pipe, engaged in a free-flowing conversation you were welcome to join when it felt right. Uncle John had "come to take his children home," the singers assured you in harmony, and "home" suddenly seemed no further away than the music itself.
The music on the Grateful Dead's two previous studio efforts, Anthem of the Sun, and Aoxomoxoa reveled in exuberant strangeness, like a carnival on the moon. By contrast, Workingman's dead, released in June 1970 (and its follow-up, American Beauty), seemed like a burnished artifact from the past, a lost treasure fromt he rich vein of music-making that Folkways archivist Harry Smith mined for his Anthology of American Folk Music. Even the sepia-toned cover of Workingman's Dead seemed to have been channeled from that homespun continuum.
When you paid attention, however, the music wasn't merely quaint or antique. While the first half of "Cumberland Blues" could have been borrowed from Merle Haggard or Buck Owens (particularly Garcia's fleet-fingered leads, which paid tribute to Don Rich's sparkling work with Owen's Buckaroos), none of those fine Bakersfield records featrued anything as down and dirty as Pigpen's pile-driving "Easy Wind" or "New Speedway Boogie." While Robert Hunter's lyrics evoke a gone world of miners, jackballers, and ladies in red, they yield insights as penetrating as anything in the Dead's acid-tested canon. Workingman's Dead proved that the Dead could come down to earth, while remaining just as cosmic.
"We wanted to take a love for a certain kind of music from time past and memorialize it, bringing it forward into the music of our own time, letting it share our space in the present and future," Hunter recalls. The result was an album of sublimely refined music that proved universally appealing; Rolling Stone readers voted it Album of the Year. "Uncle John's Band" and "Casey Jones" became the band's first radio hits, elevating Workingman's Dead to #27 on the Billboard chart.
The modest rewards of this success came to the band just in time. The LP was a jewel created (as the band's biographer Dennins McNally one put it) in the same way that diamonds are -under intense pressure. Aoxomooxoa had taken months to record and assemble. By the time it was finished the Dead were in the hole to warner bros. to the tune of $180,000-a debt they paid, in part, by releasing the glorious Live/Dead. Other demons were lurking in the background: the New orleans bust immortalized in "Truckin" on American Beauty went down two weeks before the Workingman's sessions began, and while the album was being recorded, the band discovered that its manager, drummer Mickey Hart's father, lenny, had absconded with thousands of dollars. The simpler folk structures of such tunes as "High Time" allowed the band to nail the arrangements in t rehearsal before walking into Pacific high Recording Studio, located behind the Fillmore West in San Francisco, and wrap up the new album in a couple of weeks.
The practical need to streamline this process coincided with an evolution in Garcia's notiions about the kind of album he wanted to record. "I was thinking, when we go into the studio next time, let's try a real close-to-the-bone approach, the way they make country and western records," he said later. The moody frontier ballads Garcia and hunter were writing int eir shared house in Larkspur lent themselves perfectly to this uncomplicated treatment. David Nelson, a compatriot from Garcia's coffeehouse days (and founding member of the New Riders of the Purple Sage), was invited down to play guitar on "Cumberland Blues." Friends crosby, stills & Nash offered expert tips on recording vocals, such as capturing "air blends" of two- and three-part harmonies live before doubling additional vocal tracks.
Part of the album's genius lies in its pleasing sequence of sounds and textures, such as the way Garcia's banjo doesn't pop up in the musical conversation until "Cumberland Blues," the first song on Side Two. Coproducer bob Matthews gave the band a tape of their recent compoositions in an order inspired by the powerful sequence on The Beates' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. As the tunes were recorded, the band could keep track of where they were in the narrative flow of their album-to-be.
It's astonishing to be realize that just days before recording the countrified gem "Dire Wolf" on February 16, the band played one of the most legendary and electric-runs of shows in its career, at the Fillmore East on the opposite coast. It was a heady season: when the Dead mixed the album down in early April, they were playing on a bill with Miles Davis at the Fillmore West.
In retrospect, the songs written during this period marked the high point in Garcia and Hunter's 30-year collaboration. if the tunes sound timeless, it is because they incorporate elements from various vintages of great American Music. As Hunter explains, "For 'High Time,' I wanted a song like the kind of stuff I heard rolling out of the jukeboxes of bars my father frequented when I was a kid. Probably a subliminal Hank Williams influence... a late-'40s sad feel."
hunter penned "easy Wind" after listening to a recording of blues master Robert Johnson. "I wanted it to have the spark and forward drive of one of his tunes," he says. "I failed, but I got another kind of song." (As for the "lady in red" who makes two appearances on this album, Hunter muses, "Is it Rita Hayworth or Carmen Jones?") The "Cumberland Blues" lyricist got the compliment of his life when a grizzled veteran of the Cumberland mine asked him, "I wonder what the guy who wrote this song would've thought if he'd ever known that something like the Grateful Dead was gonna do it?"
The great psychedelic poster artist Alton kelley created the down-home image on the cover by taking the band to the Mission district in San Francisco and photographing them with an old Brownie camera. (That's Hunter to the left and Kreutzmann-losing patience with the photo session in 100-degree-heat--in the doorway.) It was Garcia, driving home from the studio with Hunter one day, who remarked that all these songs about miners and engineers were turning the album into a kind of "workingman's dead."
Like the best of Bob Dylan's work and the Band's first albums, workingman's Dead is treasured not only for its music but also for the characters it crated, who inhabit an enduring time and place in the imagination. When tunes of our era are sung around a campfire in 200 years, songs on this album will be among them. - Steve Silberman

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 3, 2007 2:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD Liner Notes

Hey, thanks much SL! Greatly appreciated...I read a smidge of that one somewhere while googling your post subject line...cool.

Couldn't agree more--I know it sometimes gets me in trouble around here, but I really do think those two 1970 albums by the boys are all time greats for American Music!

Thanks again.

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Oct 3, 2007 2:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD Liner Notes

Incidentally, the liner notes for the DVD of American Beauty were written by none other than David Gans, that wordsmith!

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Oct 3, 2007 2:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD Liner Notes

right now, spending some time with the AB DVD audio, and though the mix reveals nowhere near as much hidden audio treasure (the original mix was much richer, and the production on the official release far closer to this version) it's another amazing release.

If my fingers are strong enough, maybe I'll transcribe the liner notes to it as well.

I sometimes forget how fantastic the studio releases were. I'd really love to hear a remastered Mars Hotel, or even a later (perhaps my favorite studio releases: Blues for Allah, and Terrapin Station).

Happy to be of service.

Matt

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Poster: buscameby Date: Oct 2, 2007 2:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD

Listen to what?lol

Need the link ,please!

TY

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Poster: buscameby Date: Oct 2, 2007 2:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Workingman's Dead DVD

Listen to what?lol

Need the link ,please!

TY

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